Historic Libraries and the Historiography of Art (II)

Historic Libraries and the Historiography of Art (II)

Friday 14 February 2020, 8:30 am

Hilton Chicago. Room: Lake Huron

Session Chair: Jeanne-Marie Musto

 

Participants

Elena Granuzzo, Independent Scholar, Verona

“The Cicognara Library and Michelangelo Buonarroti: A Historiographical Reading through the Sources”

 

Katie Lissamore, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen

and

Jonathan Franklin, National Gallery, London

“Art History Scholarship between the 1820s and 1870s: Contextualising the Eastlake Library at the National Gallery, London”

 

Claire Dupin De Beyssat, Institut national d’Histoire de l’art, Paris

“Tracing the Public of the First Parisian Library for Art and Archaeology: On the Readership at Doucet’s Library (1910-1914)”

 

Karolina Labowicz-Dymanus, Institute of Art, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw

“The Library of the Institute of Art of the Polish Academy of Sciences: Mirroring “Official” and “Unofficial” Distribution of Knowledge, 1949-1970”

 

Discussant

Holly Hatheway, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Princeton

 

Session Description

Historic libraries are coming into their own as resources for interpreting intellectual history. Analyzing those libraries that have informed art historians, art critics and their public has opened new paths for exploring art historiography. Whether book and manuscript collections survive intact, perhaps in their original locations, or are known only through bibliographies or inventories, they yield information that broadens established narratives of the discipline. What is more, such collections are ideally suited to documenting art history’s evolving relationship with social, intellectual and geo-political currents.

 

This session builds on a theme introduced at CAA 2019 by addressing new questions, incorporating new methodologies, and introducing previously untapped collections. New questions include, for example, the distribution and impact of “official” vs. “unofficial” resources in the Communist-era library of the Polish Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Art. Another investigates interpretations of Michelangelo through the “textual lens” of Leopoldo Cicognara’s early nineteenth-century library. New methodologies include data visualizations of the readership of an art library given to the University of Paris in 1918; the visualizations incorporate quantitative and prosopographical data. Previously untapped libraries include that of Charles Eastlake, which served him in his several roles, including as Director of the National Gallery, London. Comparative analysis of Eastlake’s library with those of precursors and contemporaries underlines how readily analysis of any one library aids and encourages the analysis of others. Taken as a whole, this session highlights how libraries not only inform but also shape the relatively young and still restive discipline of art history.

 

Jeanne-Marie Musto, PhD, MLS
Reference Services Librarian, Special Collections
Center for Jewish History, NYC
musto.jeannemarie@gmail.com
929-294-5870 (cell)
MustoObservatory.com

CFP: Library History Round Table Research Forum, 2020

The Library History Round Table (LHRT) of the American Library Association (ALA) seeks papers for its Research Forum at the 2020 ALA Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, June 25 – 30.

The theme of the Forum is “Turning Corners.”

Subjects may include—but are not limited to—historical studies of:

·        Libraries and elections

·        Libraries and women’s suffrage

·        Libraries and politics

·        Libraries and social justice

·        Turning Points in the library profession

·        Libraries’ involvement in women’s history

LHRT welcomes submissions from researchers of all backgrounds, including students, faculty, and practitioners. Proposals are due by midnight (PST) on February 29, 2020.

Each submission must include the paper title, a short proposal (up to 500 words), and the scholar’s one-page vita. Also, please indicate whether the research is in-progress or completed. It is desirable that the proposal include a problem/question, a statement of significance, objectives, methods/primary sources used for the research, and a concluding thesis/answer (or tentative conclusions for works in progress).

From the submissions, the LHRT Research Committee will select two authors to present their completed work at the Forum likely occur on Sunday, June 28, 2020. All presenters must register to attend the conference. For registration options, see ALA’s events and conferences page at http://www.ala.org/.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: February 29, 2020.
Presenters will be notified by March 8, 2020.

Please submit proposals and direct inquiries to:

Ellen Pozzi, William Paterson University

Telephone: 973-720-3784

E-mail: pozzie@wpunj.edu

Deadline Extended–CFP: Justin Winsor Library History Essay Award

Please note the Winsor deadline has been extended to February 10, 2020:

Entries are now being solicited for the Justin Winsor Library History Essay Award, presented annually by the American Library Association’s Library History Round Table (LHRT). The award recognizes the best library history essay written in English and is named in honor of the distinguished nineteenth-century librarian, historian, and bibliographer, Justin Winsor, who was also ALA’s first president. The selected author will receive a certificate and $500 cash award, as well as an invitation to have the winning essay considered for publication in the official LHRT publication Libraries: Culture, History, and Society. If the winning essay is accepted for publication, additional revisions may be required.

For a list of previous winners, click here.

Selection Criteria

Manuscripts submitted should not be previously published, previously submitted for publication, or under consideration for publication or another award. Essays should embody original historical research on a significant topic in library history, be based on primary sources whenever possible, and use good English composition and superior style. The Library History Round Table is particularly interested in works that place the subject within its broader historical, social, cultural, and political context and make interdisciplinary connections with print culture and information studies.

Essays should be organized in a form similar to that of articles published in Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, with footnotes, spelling and punctuation conforming to the latest edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Papers should not exceed thirty-five typewritten, double-spaced pages (plus footnotes and bibliography).

Submissions and Selection

Applicants must submit their essays electronically. Name and other information identifying the author should appear only on a separate cover page. Essays must be received by February 10, 2020.  The application deadline is firm and any submissions received after February 10 will not be considered.  Receipt will be confirmed within four business days.

Submit manuscripts to:

Cindy Mediavilla, Chair

LHRT Justin Winsor Award Committee

cmediavi@ucla.edu

Please use subject line: LHRT: Justin Winsor Award

CFP: Justin Winsor Library History Essay Award

Justin Winsor Library History Essay Award

Entries are now being solicited for the Justin Winsor Library History Essay Award, presented annually by the American Library Association’s Library History Round Table (LHRT). The award recognizes the best library history essay written in English and is named in honor of the distinguished nineteenth-century librarian, historian, and bibliographer, Justin Winsor, who was also ALA’s first president. The selected author will receive a certificate and $500 cash award, as well as an invitation to have the winning essay considered for publication in the official LHRT publication Libraries: Culture, History, and Society. If the winning essay is accepted for publication, additional revisions may be required.  

For a list of previous winners, click here.

Selection Criteria

Manuscripts submitted should not be previously published, previously submitted for publication, or under consideration for publication or another award. Essays should embody original historical research on a significant topic in library history, be based on primary sources whenever possible, and use good English composition and superior style. The Library History Round Table is particularly interested in works that place the subject within its broader historical, social, cultural, and political context and make interdisciplinary connections with print culture and information studies.

Essays should be organized in a form similar to that of articles published in Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, with footnotes, spelling and punctuation conforming to the latest edition of the Chicago Manual of Style. Papers should not exceed thirty-five typewritten, double-spaced pages (plus footnotes and bibliography).

Submissions and Selection

Applicants must submit their essays electronically. Name and other information identifying the author should appear only on a separate cover page. Essays must be received by February 10, 2020.  The application deadline is firm and any submissions received after February 10 will not be considered.  Receipt will be confirmed within four business days.

Submit manuscripts to:

Cindy Mediavilla, Chair

LHRT Justin Winsor Award Committee

cmediavi@ucla.edu

Please use subject line: LHRT: Justin Winsor Award