Call for News and Articles for LIHG News

The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals’ Library and Information History Group (LIHG) of the United Kingdom will release a new issue of its newsletter soon and is putting out a call for news and articles:

https://www.cilip.org.uk/library-information-history-group/publications/newsletter

The guidelines for authors can be found here:

https://www.cilip.org.uk/library-information-history-group/publications/newsletter/guidelines-contributors

On a related note, I have had a wonderful time this evening perusing the featured articles in the past issues of LIHG News. Every library historian should read Alistair Black’s  “Library History & the Information Sciences: Past and Future” on page 8 of the summer 2016 issue.  Dr. Black looks at the challenges facing library history as a field in coming years and discusses library history and its relation to broader information history.  On page 10 he notes that “the potential for history in the information sciences to flourish in the future is heightened by the fact that historical studies of the digital information revolution are likely to increase as time pushes that revolution further into the past. This will possibly have the knock-on effect of giving further boosts to histories of the antecedents of the digital information revolution, including libraries.”

There are also droves of fascinating articles in LIHG News about rare book discoveries that are adding to our knowledge of social history. For example, I just looked through one entitled “Bad hair day at Bury Assizes – An iconoclast’s tale” based on a rare book find at Aberystwyth University.  Among other things, the book discusses the morality and legality of men’s hair length in Puritan-era England.

And you must check out the splendid essay “For the Mutual Improvement of Scottish Miners” by John Crawford on page 5 of the spring 2017 issue: it provides an overview of the Leadhills Reading Society, Scotland’s first subscription library. The article also touches on the connections between Benjamin Franklin’s subscription library in Philadelphia and the mutual improvement societies in Britain.  I had no idea about these connections.

Enjoy reading more in the LIHG News archives…

Best,

Brett

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