2015 Library History Seminar XIII Registration and Travel Reimbursement Grant

The Library History Round Table (LHRT) of the American Library Association is providing free registration and travel reimbursement grants of up to $500 each for two graduate students or new professionals who wish to attend Library History Seminar XIII (LHS) at Simmons College in Boston, July 31-August 2, 2015.

This conference, which takes place only once every five years, is a unique opportunity to learn about the history of libraries and meet leading scholars in this fascinating area of study from around the world. For more about LHS, visit its website, http://gslis.simmons.edu/blogs/lhs13/.

How to apply:

Any student or new professional (less than 3 years’ experience) interested in the LHS Registration and Travel Reimbursement Grant must fill out the application form (available online at http://www.ala.org/lhrt/about-lhrt), submit graduate and undergraduate transcripts, and provide at least one letter of recommendation from a faculty member, employer, or professional colleague.

All application materials are due no later than May 29, 2015. Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted.

Send applications, transcripts, and letters to:

Dominique Daniel, LHRT Chair
Kresge Library 244
Oakland University
2200 N Squirrel Road
Rochester, MI 48309
or e-mail:
daniel@oakland.edu

Selection criteria:

The purpose of the LHS Registration and Travel Reimbursement Grant is to enable graduate students and new professionals who have an interest in the history of libraries to attend a specialized conference. The grant review committee does not consider age, gender/sex, national origin, race, or religion in reviewing applications. Please do not hesitate to apply, even if you have done little scholarly research, have had few courses in library history, or are not currently a member of LHRT. We are most interested in applicants’ potential to grow as a library historian, and their ability to incorporate historical knowledge and research in their professional life. Preference will go to applicants who live outside of the East Coast, and who have documented interest (either through coursework, professional responsibilities, or other activities) in historical aspects of libraries, reading, or print culture.

Expectations of grant winners:

Winners of the grants must make and pay for all their own travel arrangements in advance. Each grant includes free registration to the Seminar (which includes all programs, plus one dinner and a reception). All other costs are the responsibility of the grant winners, who will be reimbursed up to $500 each, AFTER the Seminar, for legitimate travel expenses (such as airfare, car mileage, hotel, or meals). Please note that it is ALA’s policy not to reimburse for alcoholic beverages. The projected cost of the conference hotel is $50 to 175 a night (dorm accommodation possible), and travelers will have a variety of eating options. No later than August 15, 2015, the grant winner must submit receipts for all claimed expenses.

Winners will also be asked to write a brief article (250-500 words) for the LHRT News blog, describing the sessions they attended and what they learned.

Finally, winners are encouraged to become individual members of the American Library Association and the Library History Round Table.

Contact:

Please direct all questions and materials to:

Dominique Daniel, LHRT Chair
Kresge Library 244
Oakland University
2200 N Squirrel Road
Rochester, MI 48309
or e-mail:
daniel@oakland.edu

LHS 2015 student travel grant application

2015 LHRT Edward G. Holley Memorial Lecture

Ezra Greenspan, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Chair in Humanities, Southern Methodist University, will be the 2015 Holley Lecture speaker at the upcoming American Library Association Annual Conference in San Francisco. His presentation will address a key question in library history: Where do the lives of individuals, books and serials, archives, and libraries intersect?

The talk, The Lives of Persons, Printed Matter, and Institutions of Letters, will explore the intersections in the lives of nineteenth-century African Americans, a people for whom personhood, literacy, and access to institutions of letters was, on the one hand, contested by the white majority; and, on the other, essential for self- and community-formation.

When: June 28, 2015, 10:30-11:30am

Where: Moscone Center, San Francisco (Room TBA)

DSC_8902

Ezra Greenspan is Edmund J. and Louis W. Kahn Chair in Humanities and Professor of English, Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. A literary and cultural historian, he writes and teaches about the history of print and digital culture in the United States. He was co-founding editor of “Book History” (active 1997-2014) and is the editor or author of various books, including biographies of G. P. Putnam and William Wells Brown, a finalist for the 2014 National Book Critics Circle award for biography.

Welcome from the newsletter editor

Hi. This is the first post to the new Library History Round Table’s (LHRT) blog, LHRT News. My name is Doug Campbell, the LHRT News Editor. I envision this to be a site to share information about people, events, and other relevant items related to the history of libraries and librarians. For the first post, I wanted to share a little bit about myself and how I “got into” library history.

 

dougwillis    Why do I love library history? I love libraries, that’s why. This is the first post of the new Library History Round Table’s blog, LHRT News, and I am proud to be it’s first editor. In the first post, I decided to take the opportunity to introduce myself and share a little bit of my interest in the history of libraries.

Looking back at my childhood through my undergraduate college years, I am an unlikely candidate to be an editor of a blog about libraries and their history, not to mention be a member of LHRT and the American Library Association. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I visited the public library in my small home town of Van Alstyne, Texas. I can count on the fingers of my other hand the number of times that I walked through the doors of the academic library at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, the oldest town in the Lone Star State. Except for comic books given to me by my grandmother, I wasn’t a big reader from adolescence through graduate school. It was not until graduate school, seminary actually, that the seed of interest in libraries and the services they provide was planted in me.

I entered Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary in Mill Valley, California in 1994 with intentions to prepare to become an overseas missionary. A year later, I began working in the seminary’s library as a part-time circulation clerk. A year and half after that, through a series of fortuitous events, I was promoted to circulation supervisor, soon thereafter becoming the acting reference librarian, although I didn’t have a library degree. I worked in the seminary’s library for three years until I finished my master of divinity. While working in the library, the seminary librarians saw promise and potential in me as a professional librarian, encouraging me to consider library school. Although I enjoyed working in the library, I still had not given up on the idea of the ministry.

In 2000, I moved to Waco, Texas, and began working in the library at McLennan Community College, staying there for two years. It was in Waco that I decided to take the leap (of faith?) and attend library school. Again, the librarians encouraged me to consider a career in libraries and earn a master of library science. I visited the University of North Texas (UNT) to look into their library school. I met with Herman Totten who asked me why I wanted to become a librarian. I told him that enjoyed helping people find information. He said that was the perfect answer because too many librarians entered the profession because they like to read. It was then that I realized that librarianship is not unlike ministry in that they are both dedicated to serving others. I decided to go from a man of The Book to a man of all books, so to speak. I moved to Denton, Texas and began the MLS program at UNT in 2002, graduating in 2004.

It was in library school that I was introduced to ALA. I always had an interest in history, so I naturally began to look into the history of libraries. A LIS faculty member, Elizabeth Figa, told me about the LHRT and I began to dig around its web page. I enjoyed looking through the library history bibliographies, and began reading some of the articles and books listed. I discovered that studying library history was “a thing,” and that people actually did research in this area. I thought that was pretty cool. I began to discover and research figures and ideas in US library history such as William Ladd Ropes, librarian at Andover Theological Seminary from 1866-1905; Jennie Maas Flexner, librarian at the New York Public Library from 1929-1944; and economist, Alvin Saunders Johnson, economist and author of the A Report to Carnegie Corporation of New York on the Policy of Donations to Free Public Libraries  (1915) and The Public Library, A People’s University (1938). I also enjoy researching the history of the Library Bill of Rights, censorship in public libraries, and libraries as places.

My first involvement with LHRT was attending the ALA Midwinter meeting in Boston in 2010. I attended some lectures at the 2010 Annual Conference in D.C. that summer. I have attended the LHRT meetings and events in Anaheim (2012), Chicago (2013), and Las Vegas (2014), and the 2013 Midwinter meetings in Seattle. I have enjoyed getting to know library history researchers and fellow enthusiasts at these meetings and virtually. I am looking forward to meeting more of you and doing whatever I can to help spread the good news, dare I say gospel, of library history. Library history is an interesting history. It is as much, if not more so, about people than it is about the sharing of books and information. It is certain the story of the connection between people and information, and in between these two are librarians, a diverse and interesting group of people, of which I am proud to be a part.